Drug treatment facility planned for Greenfield raises concerns


Council makes final appointments to police department

Angela Shepherd - For The Times-Gazette



Substance abuse program director Bill Rice, right, talks to Greenfield Village Council on Wednesday about an intensive, inpatient substance abuse treatment program planned to begin in Greenfield in October. Also pictured are council members Brenda Losey and Mark Clyburn.


An intensive, inpatient treatment program through a partnership between Scioto Paint Valley Mental Health and the Paint Valley Alcohol, Drug Addiction & Mental Health Services Board (ADAMH) is planned to be up and running in Greenfield by the fall, and the village’s council members have concerns.

Dominant among the worries voiced by council members during Wednesday’s meeting was the facility’s proximity to the Head Start program at the armory located just up the block.

The building that will house the program is the former site of the Greenfield branch of the Highland County District Library. It is owned by Scioto Paint Valley and is just west of Save A Lot on the east end of Jefferson Street.

Council chair Betty Jackman said two letters were received by council stating concerns about the planned facility, one from parents of children in the Head Start program, and another by a business owner in the same block.

Representatives of the mental health organizations told Greenfield Village Council members that the intensive, 30-day treatment program is planned to begin in October.

According to substance abuse program director Bill Rice, the Lynn Goff Clinic will house a maximum of 12 males with substance abuse issues.

He said “supervision will be very stringent” and those in the program will be confined to the property unless they are with staff. Part of the criteria for admission is that the person shall have no convictions of a violent crime, sexual-related offenses, or crimes against children.

He said that Vivitrol injections, which blocks the effects of opiates and has helped addicts be successful in their battle with addiction, will also be available to those in the program.

“Thirty days is not going to fix anybody,” Rice said, “but it’s a good start.”

While council members made it clear that they support people receiving help, there are concerns in regard to the clinic that need to be addressed, such as the fact that even though those in the program are confined to the facility and not allowed to leave without being accompanied by a staff member, they are not forced to stay. But if they leave, Rice said, they are leaving all the benefits of the program. Other concerns included the location, having that concentration of “criminals” in one area, the number of staff on hand at any given time, the village’s ability to have a say in whether the facility can exist, and the village’s recourse should there be problems.

According to city manager Ron Coffey, he and law director Brian Zets could find nothing in the “current coding” to prevent the clinic from opening up.

Council member Chris Borreson made a motion that Zets explore Greenfield’s options on the matter. Council member Brenda Losey was the only dissenting vote on the motion.

In other business, Coffey recommended to council the final appointments of Greenfield Police Chief Jeremiah Oyer, Sgt. Brian McNeil and Sgt. Shawn Shanks, who have all been under a probationary period that is now complete. Council unanimously approved the appointments.

Each officer was promoted to their respective rank after the village’s Civil Service Commission was dissolved last year.

Coffey reported that Greenfield’s industrial park, though still not certified by the state, is currently being featured on a website maintained by the Appalachian Partnership for Economic Growth (APEG) that is for commercial sites for industrial parks. The link to the website can be found at greenfieldohio.net, and then by clicking on the industry page.

While officials have worked to get the South Central Ohio Industrial Park certified with the state, which would increase its visibility among those looking for such a site, the park has not yet been certified. Coffey said that a new round of certifications will be made next month and he is hopeful that Greenfield’s park will be among the certified sites.

The city manager also reported that the Shopko building and more than four acres of land at 1300 Jefferson St. on the west end of Greenfield will be auctioned off on Aug. 9 at 1 p.m. via an online auction. For more information go to amcbid.com.

The Greenfield Village Council meets in regular session the first and third Wednesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the council chambers on the first floor of the City Building. All meetings are open to the public. Reach the village offices by calling 937-981-3500.

Substance abuse program director Bill Rice, right, talks to Greenfield Village Council on Wednesday about an intensive, inpatient substance abuse treatment program planned to begin in Greenfield in October. Also pictured are council members Brenda Losey and Mark Clyburn.
http://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2017/07/web1_Greenfield-council-pic-2.jpgSubstance abuse program director Bill Rice, right, talks to Greenfield Village Council on Wednesday about an intensive, inpatient substance abuse treatment program planned to begin in Greenfield in October. Also pictured are council members Brenda Losey and Mark Clyburn.
Council makes final appointments to police department

Angela Shepherd

For The Times-Gazette

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