OhioSE’s Stepp certified economic developer


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OhioSE’s Taylor Stepp works the organization’s southern counties including Highland County.

OhioSE’s Taylor Stepp works the organization’s southern counties including Highland County.


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Ohio Southeast Economic Development (OhioSE) has announced that Taylor Stepp, project manager, earned the designation of Certified Economic Developer (CEcD). He joins OhioSE President Mike Jacoby in that realm, who also earned the CEcD designation.

The CEcD designation is an international recognition regulated by the International Economic Development Council that denotes a mastery of skills in economic development, professional attainment, and qualified and dedicated practitioners in the economic development field that set the standard of excellence within the profession.

“Taylor’s commitment to his profession is evidenced by his record of success in managing investment and job creation projects in the OhioSE sub-region he covers,” said Katy Farber, OhioSE vice president. “It is no surprise to me that he has achieved this impressive designation. His hard work and determination are making positive changes in our region. He is a valued member of our OhioSE team.”

Stepp is project manager for OhioSE’s southern counties – Adams, Gallia, Highland, Jackson, Lawrence, Pike, Ross, Scioto and Vinton. Stepp’s work with OhioSE has brought major investment into Southeast Ohio through relocations and expansions, which have yielded nearly 1,000 new jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars of capital investment. Prior to joining the team, Taylor was a JobsOhio project coordinator responsible for Northwestern and Northeastern Ohio.

“I am honored to join development professionals internationally with this credentialing,” said Stepp. “Throughout the certification process, I have deepened my knowledge and have learned best practices and new tools that I look forward to putting into practice in OhioSE. Southeastern Ohio is on an upward trajectory and I am optimistic that we can continue improving the economic well-being of our region.”

To receive the designation of CEcD, candidates must have at least four years of consecutive, paid and full-time economic development related work experience within the past six years and pass a rigorous and comprehensive exam consisting of three parts over the span of two days. The exam tests a practitioner’s knowledge, proficiency and judgement in several key areas of economic development.

As highly competent economic development professionals, CEcDs work with public officials, business leaders and community members to build upon and maximize the economic development sector. Excellence in the economic development profession improves the well-being, quality of life and opportunities for individuals, businesses and communities. According to IEDC, there are approximately 1,100 active CEcDs in the United States, and 27 active CEcDs in the state of Ohio.

Submitted by Tom Crooks, partner, Stonewall Group.

OhioSE’s Taylor Stepp works the organization’s southern counties including Highland County.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2021/07/web1_Taylor.jpgOhioSE’s Taylor Stepp works the organization’s southern counties including Highland County. Submitted photo

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