Mental health resources available for veterans


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The Chillicothe VA Medical Center and its Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs) are available to veterans during the current crisis in Afghanistan. Veterans may be feeling distressed about experiences during military service. You are not alone and it’s normal to feel this way. Talking with friends and family, reaching out to battle buddies, connecting with a peer-to-peer network, or signing up for mental health services can help.

In reaction to current events in Afghanistan, veterans may:

· Feel frustrated, sad, helpless, grief, or distressed;

· Feel angry or betrayed;

· Experience an increase in mental health symptoms like symptoms of PTSD or depression;

· Sleep poorly, drink more, or use more drugs;

· Try to avoid all reminders, media, or shy away from social situations;

· Have more military and homecoming memories.

Feeling distress is a normal reaction to negative events, especially ones that feel personal. It can be helpful to let yourself feel those feelings rather than try to avoid them. Often, these feelings will naturally run their course. If they continue without easing up or if you feel overwhelmed by them, the suggestions below can be helpful.

Strategies for Managing Ongoing Distress

It can be helpful to focus on the present and to engage in the activities that are most meaningful and valuable to you. Is there something you can do today that is important to you? This can be as an individual, a family member, a parent, or a community member. Something that is meaningful to you in regard to your work or your spirituality? Such activities won’t change the past or the things you can’t control, but they can help life feel meaningful and reduce distress, despite the things you cannot change.

It can also help to consider your thinking. Ask yourself if your thoughts are helpful to you right now. Are there ways you can change your thinking to be more accurate and less distressing? For example, are you using extreme thinking where you see the situation as all bad or all good? If so, try and think in less extreme terms.

Consider more general coping strategies that you may want to try including:

· Engage in positive activities — Try to engage in positive, healthy, or meaningful activities, even if they are small, simple actions. Doing things that are rewarding, meaningful, or enjoyable, even if you don’t feel like it, can make you feel better.

· Stay Connected. Spend time with people who give you a sense of security, calm, or happiness, or those who best understand what you are going through.

· Practice good self care — Look for positive coping strategies that help you manage your emotions. Listening to music, exercising, practicing breathing routines, spending time in nature or with animals, journaling, or reading inspirational text are some simple ways to help manage overwhelming or distressing emotions.

· Stick to your routines — It can be helpful to stick to a schedule for when you sleep, eat, work, and do other day-to-day activities.

· Limit media exposure — Limit how much news you take in if media coverage is increasing your distress.

· Use a mobile app — Consider one of VA’s self-help apps (www.ptsd.va.gov/appvid/mobile/) that can help you deal with common reactions like, stress, sadness, and anxiety. You can also track your symptoms over time.

· PTSD coach online (www.ptsd.va.gov/apps/ptsdcoachonline/default.htm) — A series of online video coaches will guide you through 17 tools to help you manage stress. PTSD Coach Online is used on a computer, rather than a mobile device, and therefore can offer tools that involve writing.

If you develop your own ways of adapting to ongoing events and situations, you may gain a stronger sense of being able to deal with challenges, a greater sense of meaning or purpose, and an ability to mentor and support others in similar situations.

Available Resources · Veterans Crisis Line – If you are having thoughts of suicide, call 1-800-273-8255, then PRESS 1 or visit www.veteranscrisisline.net.

For more information about nental health services at the Chillicothe VA, call 740-773-1141, ext. 17898.

Veterans not enrolled in the VA health care system are encouraged to visit www.chillicothe.va.gov/enrollment.asp to register or call 740-772-7170 with questions.

Visit the Chillicothe VA webpage (www.va.gov/chillicothe) and follow us on facebook (facebook.com/ChillicotheVAMC) and twitter (@chillicothevamc).

Submitted by Stacia Ruby, public affairs officer, Chillicothe VA Medical Center.

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