HPD officer commended for helping driver


Mayor’s report focuses on improving traffic flow

By Tim Colliver - tcolliver@aimmediamidwest.com



Hillsboro police officer Clint Sharp, left, receives a certificate of commendation from Hillsboro Police Chief Darrin Goudy at Monday night’s city council meeting.

Hillsboro police officer Clint Sharp, left, receives a certificate of commendation from Hillsboro Police Chief Darrin Goudy at Monday night’s city council meeting.


Saying he always wants to “recognize members that go above and beyond,” Hillsboro Chief of Police Darrin Goudy presented Officer Clint Sharp with a certificate of commendation Monday night at a Hillsboro City Council meeting.

On May 3 of this year, Sharp was on patrol doing a business check at Lowe’s Home Improvement shortly after 11 p.m. when he saw what appeared to be an unoccupied vehicle near the dock area.

While doing a more in-depth investigation, he found an unconscious male in the driver’s seat and after attempting to revive him, discovered the man wasn’t breathing and had a bluish skin tone. Sharp radioed for back-up and for the Paint Creek Joint EMS/Fire District to dispatch medical help to the scene.

After a further check of the vehicle, Sharp found a hypodermic needle and determined the male was experiencing an opioid overdose.

Two responding officers from the HPD removed the man from the vehicle and EMTs from Paint Creek administered Narcan. It took four doses of the opioid overdose counteracting drug to revive him, and afterward Sharp took it upon himself to calm and reassure the subject until he was transported to Highland District Hospital.

Sharp later followed up with the hospital and discovered the subject was a military veteran with a family, who had battled addiction issues in the past. He had been sober and was gainfully employed, but had suffered a relapse, and was grateful to Sharp for his response, compassion and quick thinking on the scene.

“I’m proud to say all the personnel in the Hillsboro Police Department take great pride in serving our community with the utmost in professionalism,” Gpudy said.

In other business at the Monday’s meeting, Mayor Drew Hastings submitted a report focusing on improving traffic flow and congestion, in particular proposing installation of a new traffic signal at the intersection of Pea Ridge Road and SR 73.

In his report to council, Hastings also suggested the traffic light at SR 73 and Fenner Avenue become a flashing yellow light, at least until it can be ascertained how much impact the Rural King store will have.

He also is asking that the stop sign at the North and North West streets intersection be removed as well.

Citing the absence of the school and a change in demographics, Hastings also has designs on improvements in traffic flow on SR 138, which is South Street as it enters town from the west.

Hastings’ wish list for that part of town includes removing stop signs at a pair of intersections — Vine and West South, and Elm and West South.

After concerns were expressed by some members regarding traffic safety, council took Hasting’s recommendations under advisement.

Safety Service Director Mel McKenzie welcomed a pair of new employees to the city. Patty Burns assumes the office of consumer services clerk, moving there from her elected position of city treasurer. Tony Weissman, who most recently was a consultant for an engineering firm and the lead building official for Covington, Ky. is now the code enforcement and certified building official.

Hillsboro Planning Commission Chairman Tom Eichinger announced the commission met on July 16, with one of the topics on the agenda being passage of amended zoning code legislation, which city council passed on July 9 as emergency legislation so that it can be effective immediately.

A public hearing is scheduled for Aug. 20 at 5 p.m. to hear comments on a request for a variance at 303 Wenmar Ave. for an accessory building that exceeds the maximum height, as stated in the city code.

The third reading rule was suspended on an ordinance that came before city planners Monday.

An ordinance declaring improvement to parcels of real estate property inside the City of Hillsboro to be public purpose, and exempted from real property taxation, was adopted Monday night after two readings. The ordinance also calls for establishment of a tax increment equivalent fund. Its main purpose is for infrastructure use and benefit.

The other ordinance, which allows citizens of Hillsboro to bring a lawsuit against another individual for injuries caused by that person’s use of an illegal controlled substance, will have its third reading during next month’s council meeting.

Near the end of the meeting, council entered into executive session to discuss the ongoing subject of formally joining the Paint Creek Joint EMS/Fire District.

Upon emerging from the discussion 15 minutes later, it was decided that no action would be taken by council, but the details will continue to be reviewed jointly by the Finance and Street and Safety committees.

The next meeting of Hillsboro City Council is scheduled for Monday, Sept. 10.

Tim Colliver can be reached at tcolliver@aimmediamidwest.com.

Hillsboro police officer Clint Sharp, left, receives a certificate of commendation from Hillsboro Police Chief Darrin Goudy at Monday night’s city council meeting.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/08/web1_Goudy-congrats-to-Sharp.jpgHillsboro police officer Clint Sharp, left, receives a certificate of commendation from Hillsboro Police Chief Darrin Goudy at Monday night’s city council meeting.
Mayor’s report focuses on improving traffic flow

By Tim Colliver

tcolliver@aimmediamidwest.com