Sewer study shows issues


Greenfield treating more water than it’s pumping out

By Angela Shepherd - For The Times-Gazette



Greenfield Village Council members, from left, Phil Clyburn, Mark Branham, Brenda Losey, Kyle Barr and Eric Borsini are pictured at this week’s regular meeting.

Greenfield Village Council members, from left, Phil Clyburn, Mark Branham, Brenda Losey, Kyle Barr and Eric Borsini are pictured at this week’s regular meeting.


Photo by Angela Shepherd

A recent report following a study done on Greenfield’s sanitary sewer lines has highlighted the issues the village must now decide how to deal with.

City Manager Todd Wilkin, in his report at this week’s council meeting, discussed the findings and the village’s water inventory, as well as the age and overall state of the infrastructure.

Chief among the concerns is the amount of water being treated versus what is pumped. In a normal day, approximately 400,000 gallons of water are pumped out to the village, but about 1.1 million gallons are being treated. So even during a normal day, there are inflow and infiltration (I & I) issues. Those issues are compounded during a rain event, and the amount of water getting treated typically rises to around 1.6 million gallons.

“This is a big deal and we cannot think about growth considering our current infrastructure,” Wilkin said. “We are passionate about fixing this critical infrastructure so we can continue to grow as a community.”

Over recent months, Stantec Consulting Services conducted a villagewide micro-monitoring study of the sanitary sewer system to identify where the biggest issues of I & I are occurring.

Council members were provided a map developed from the study, and another document detailing information about the village’s water system as it is. As council members have this information, they can share it with citizens when they are asked about water issues or why streets aren’t getting paved.

“We can go out and pave streets,” Wilkin said, but armed with the information on sewer lines that must be addressed before fresh pavement is laid atop failing infrastructure.

Wilkin said the village had to act on these issues before it could consider growth. “We have to address all these issues,” he said, “so that we are planning the redevelopment of our community the proper way.”

Wilkin said previously if the water intrusion matter isn’t addressed, it could lead to the EPA demanding the village expand the wastewater treatment plant because of all the extra water that is getting treated.

The problem isn’t at the wastewater treatment plant. The problem is in the sewer lines, and that is why the village had the micro-monitoring study done. Now, with some understanding of the scope of the situation, the village can decide where to start and seek appropriate grant funding.

On the matter of the sewer line issues, council chair Phil Clyburn said the village is being proactive.

“We have started planning with our engineer and our department heads to come up with a complete plan on how we strategically tackle this issue,” Wilkin said.

In the administration’s efforts to foster active local boards and council committees, Wilkin addressed vacancy issues for council members to rectify. Following the regular business of the meeting, council members made appointments to the Community Improvement Corporation board, the income tax review board, the zoning board of appeals, the recreations committee, and the tree commission.

In other business, council approved legislation directing Wilkin to enter into a contract with Platinum Commercial Roofing for replacement of the roof on the City Building.

Other approved legislation included council accepting a donation from GCTV for $22,563. According to councilman Eric Borsini, who serves on the council’s finance committee, the money will go toward police officer pay.

Wilkin said in his report that the police department is short two officers. Council approved a request for him to proceed with applying for a Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant which would pay for 75 percent of new hire or rehire costs.

“As you are aware, our police department has been working hard to remove crime from our neighborhoods and this grant will provide more manpower to continue to push these efforts,” he said.

Wilkin and council members thanked Caleb Mootispaw, as well as councilman Kyle Barr, for a video they created that highlights Greenfield. They made the video for submission in the HGTV Home Town Takeover contest. The video can be seen on Youtube. Search “Greenfield: A Canvas.”

Clyburn also extended his gratitude to all those participating in the contest. Barr personally thanked Mootispaw, as well as all who are “working to bring attention to our town” for the potential renovation offered through the contest.

Council member Brenda Losey announced that Ohio Means Jobs host a U.S. Census hiring event on Feb. 7 from 9 a.m. to noon at 1575 N. High St., Suite 31A, in Hillsboro. Losey said it is likely that candidates will get an interview “on the spot.”

The next Lunch with the City Manager is set for Friday, Feb. 21 at Jerry’s Pizza at 11 a.m. The monthly meeting gives residents the opportunity to get caught up on efforts of the village, offer their own thoughts and ideas, and talk about things with Wilkin in a less formal setting than a council meeting. All residents are welcome.

The Greenfield Village Council meets in regular session the first and third Tuesday of each month. The meetings are held in the council chambers on the first floor of the City Building at 7:30 p.m. For information and updates, go to greenfieldohio.net.

Angela Shepherd is a correspondent for the village of Greenfield.

Greenfield Village Council members, from left, Phil Clyburn, Mark Branham, Brenda Losey, Kyle Barr and Eric Borsini are pictured at this week’s regular meeting.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/02/web1_2-4-20-council-1.jpgGreenfield Village Council members, from left, Phil Clyburn, Mark Branham, Brenda Losey, Kyle Barr and Eric Borsini are pictured at this week’s regular meeting. Photo by Angela Shepherd
Greenfield treating more water than it’s pumping out

By Angela Shepherd

For The Times-Gazette