Saluting community servant Joe Mahan


A hearse carrying the body of longtime Hillsboro public servant Joe Mahan was part of a line of vehicles that stretched nearly half a mile as the city of Hillsboro said good-bye Friday to the former two-time president of the Hillsboro Uptown Business Association. The funeral processional parade meandered through the city along a route that both saluted the local businesses he owned and those he vigorously promoted. Family, friends and colleagues lined the streets of the parade route. Nearly 50 vehicles driven by other business owners and the Eagle Riders motorcycle club from Hillsboro Eagles Aerie 1161 followed the hearse from the Thompson Funeral Home for the final trip up North High Street and burial in the Hillsboro Cemetery. Mahan, 50, passed away unexpectedly March 29.

A hearse carrying the body of longtime Hillsboro public servant Joe Mahan was part of a line of vehicles that stretched nearly half a mile as the city of Hillsboro said good-bye Friday to the former two-time president of the Hillsboro Uptown Business Association. The funeral processional parade meandered through the city along a route that both saluted the local businesses he owned and those he vigorously promoted. Family, friends and colleagues lined the streets of the parade route. Nearly 50 vehicles driven by other business owners and the Eagle Riders motorcycle club from Hillsboro Eagles Aerie 1161 followed the hearse from the Thompson Funeral Home for the final trip up North High Street and burial in the Hillsboro Cemetery. Mahan, 50, passed away unexpectedly March 29.


Tim Colliver | The Times-Gazette

A hearse carrying the body of longtime Hillsboro public servant Joe Mahan was part of a line of vehicles that stretched nearly half a mile as the city of Hillsboro said good-bye Friday to the former two-time president of the Hillsboro Uptown Business Association. The funeral processional parade meandered through the city along a route that both saluted the local businesses he owned and those he vigorously promoted. Family, friends and colleagues lined the streets of the parade route. Nearly 50 vehicles driven by other business owners and the Eagle Riders motorcycle club from Hillsboro Eagles Aerie 1161 followed the hearse from the Thompson Funeral Home for the final trip up North High Street and burial in the Hillsboro Cemetery. Mahan, 50, passed away unexpectedly March 29.

A hearse carrying the body of longtime Hillsboro public servant Joe Mahan was part of a line of vehicles that stretched nearly half a mile as the city of Hillsboro said good-bye Friday to the former two-time president of the Hillsboro Uptown Business Association. The funeral processional parade meandered through the city along a route that both saluted the local businesses he owned and those he vigorously promoted. Family, friends and colleagues lined the streets of the parade route. Nearly 50 vehicles driven by other business owners and the Eagle Riders motorcycle club from Hillsboro Eagles Aerie 1161 followed the hearse from the Thompson Funeral Home for the final trip up North High Street and burial in the Hillsboro Cemetery. Mahan, 50, passed away unexpectedly March 29.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/04/web1_Mahan-hearse-B-2.jpgA hearse carrying the body of longtime Hillsboro public servant Joe Mahan was part of a line of vehicles that stretched nearly half a mile as the city of Hillsboro said good-bye Friday to the former two-time president of the Hillsboro Uptown Business Association. The funeral processional parade meandered through the city along a route that both saluted the local businesses he owned and those he vigorously promoted. Family, friends and colleagues lined the streets of the parade route. Nearly 50 vehicles driven by other business owners and the Eagle Riders motorcycle club from Hillsboro Eagles Aerie 1161 followed the hearse from the Thompson Funeral Home for the final trip up North High Street and burial in the Hillsboro Cemetery. Mahan, 50, passed away unexpectedly March 29. Tim Colliver | The Times-Gazette