Second COVID death in Highland County


Cases continue to increase in Highland County

By McKenzie Caldwell - mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com



This graphic maps out the number of COVID-19-related cases that resulted in the patient’s hospitalization each day in Highland County from March 1 to Aug. 11. The data is based on the dates patients were admitted to the hospital.


Courtesy graphic

A second patient has died of COVID-19 in Highland County, the Highland County Health Department announced in a news release Wednesday evening.

“The deceased individual was a male in his 70s, and passed away at the hospital,” the news release said. “The Highland County Health Department urges our community, our family, and our friends to support public health recommendations. This includes wearing facial coverings, physical distancing, avoiding crowded areas, and frequent hand washing. Please respect this family’s privacy as they mourn the loss of a loved one.”

The news release said no additional information about the victim will be made available at this time.

The health department reported the first COVID-19-related death in Highland County on May 4. The first patient to die in connection with COVID-19 was a man in his 80s.

Since the pandemic began, Highland County has had a total of 181 lab-confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases as of Wednesday, according to the Highland County Health Department.

In a previous Facebook post, the health department stated that probable cases “includes clinical presentation, epidemiological link, or FDA-approved antigen/antibody test.” The health department has documented 13 such cases in Highland County since the pandemic began.

As of Wednesday, the health department reported that there are 32 patients who are actively sick and nine currently hospitalized in connection with COVID-19; a total of 147 patients have recovered.

Between Monday and Wednesday, the health department reported an increase of 12 cases.

According to the Ohio Department of Health, of the cases in Highland County as of Thursday:

* 30 cases involved 60- to 69-year-olds, three of whom were hospitalized.

* 30 cases involved 40- to 49-year-olds, two of whom were hospitalized.

* 28 cases involved 50- to 59-year-olds, two of whom were hospitalized.

* 27 cases involved 70- to 79-year-olds, eight of whom were hospitalized and one of whom later died.

* 23 cases involved 20- to 29-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 13 cases involved 30- to 39-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 13 cases involved 0- to 19-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 3 cases involved someone 80 years old or older, all of whom were hospitalized and one of whom later died.

* 2 cases involved someone of an unknown age range, one of whom was hospitalized.

As of Thursday, there had been 105,426 COVID-19 cases in Ohio since the pandemic began — 12,023 of which resulted in hospitalization and 3,755 of which resulted in death. A total of 83,642 patients are presumed recovered, which the ODH defines as cases that have over 21 days since the onset of COVID-19 symptoms and that did not result in death.

Highland County remains at a level 2 public emergency, which represents increased COVID-19 exposure and spread, according to the ODH’s public health advisory system.

Nearby, as of Thursday, Brown and Clermont counties were upgraded to level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread.

Adams and Pike counties were downgraded to level 1 public emergencies, which represent active exposure and spread.

As of Thursday, the ODH indicated that Highland County has met three risk indicators: the risk indicator for an increase in new cases per capita in the last two weeks, or “Indicator 1”; the risk indicator for the number of cases in a non-congregate setting, or “Indicator 3”; and the risk indicator for a sustained increase in the number of patients with COVID-like illness or symptoms visiting emergency departments, “Indicator 4,” which is flagged after a county experiences a sustained increase for five or more consecutive days.

Reach McKenzie Caldwell at 937-402-2570.

https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/08/web1_Highland-Co.-Health-Dept.-logo-1.jpg

This graphic maps out the number of COVID-19-related cases that resulted in the patient’s hospitalization each day in Highland County from March 1 to Aug. 11. The data is based on the dates patients were admitted to the hospital.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/08/web1_COVIDSummaryData_Hospitalizations.jpegThis graphic maps out the number of COVID-19-related cases that resulted in the patient’s hospitalization each day in Highland County from March 1 to Aug. 11. The data is based on the dates patients were admitted to the hospital. Courtesy graphic
Cases continue to increase in Highland County

By McKenzie Caldwell

mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com