HCHD: 12 actively sick


Highland Co. remains at level 1 public emergency

By McKenzie Caldwell - mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com



The Ohio Department of Health has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange, and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red.

The Ohio Department of Health has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange, and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red.


Graphic courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health

As of Friday, Highland County has had a total of 227 lab-confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases, according to the Highland County Health Department.

In a Facebook post last week, Highland County Health Commissioner Jared Warner stated that probable cases must “[meet] clinical criteria AND epidemiologic evidence with no confirmatory laboratory testing performed for COVID-19” or “[meet] presumptive laboratory evidence AND either clinical criteria OR epidemiologic evidence.”

As of Friday, the health department had documented 20 probable cases in Highland County since the pandemic began.

The health department also reported that as of Friday there were currently 12 actively sick patients and one COVID-19-related hospitalization, and the health department is currently monitoring 26 people for symptoms.

Since the COVID-19 outbreak reached Highland County, there have been a total of 24 COVID-19-related hospitalizations and three COVID-19-related deaths, and 212 patients have recovered from COVID-19.

According to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), which reported 208 cases in the county as of Friday, of the cases in Highland County:

* 36 cases involved 40- to 49-year-olds, three of whom were hospitalized.

* 35 cases involved 50- to 59-year-olds, three of whom were hospitalized.

* 34 cases involved 70- to 79-year-olds, eight of whom were hospitalized and one of whom later died.

* 32 cases involved 60- to 69-year-olds, four of whom were hospitalized.

* 29 cases involved 20- to 29-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 19 cases involved 30- to 39-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 19 cases involved 0- to 19-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* Three cases involved someone 80 years old or older, all of whom were hospitalized and two of whom later died.

* One case involved someone of an unknown age range.

As of Friday, there had been 135,326 total COVID-19 cases throughout Ohio since the pandemic began — 14,236 of which resulted in hospitalization and 4,403 of which resulted in death. A total of 113,053 patients are presumed recovered, which ODH defines as cases that have over 21 days since the onset of COVID-19 symptoms and that did not result in death.

As of Thursday, Highland County remains at a level 1 public emergency, which represents active COVID-19 exposure and spread.

In mid-July, ODH upgraded Highland County to a level 2 public emergency, which represents increased COVID-19 exposure and spread. The county remained a level 2 public emergency until Aug. 20, when it returned to a level 1 rating.

For more information about ODH’s public health advisory system, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/public-health-advisory-system/.

In related news from the state, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine expressed concerns for the coming flu season, according to a Thursday press release from DeWine’s office.

“While the flu can be deadly on its own, we also are concerned that Ohioans who get both the flu and COVID-19 at the same time could become severely, if not fatally, ill,” DeWine said. “Our youngest and oldest Ohioans, those who are pregnant, those in long-term care facilities, and those with chronic health conditions may be especially susceptible to severe illness or complications from the flu.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone 6 months of age and older receive an annual flu shot, with rare exception. The recommendation includes flu shots for pregnant women, whose vaccinations can protect their babies after birth.

Those who are elderly and need help getting to their physician’s office can contact their local Area Agency on Aging at 866-243-5678 to access transportation resources and other services.

Anyone without a primary healthcare provider can visit vaccinefinder.org to find nearby pharmacies and other healthcare locations offering the flu vaccine.

For more information on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ohio, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Reach McKenzie Caldwell at 937-402-2570.

The Ohio Department of Health has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange, and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/09/web1_covidupdate-1.jpgThe Ohio Department of Health has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange, and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Graphic courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health
Highland Co. remains at level 1 public emergency

By McKenzie Caldwell

mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com