County: 27 actively sick


DeWine: Increase in ‘red’ counties

By McKenzie Caldwell - mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com



This graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences.

This graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences.


On Friday, the Highland County Health Department reported that it had seen a large increase over a two-day period.

In a Facebook post, the health department requested that Highland County residents wear masks, maintain social distance, wash their hands, stay home when sick.

As of Friday, Highland County has had a total of 269 lab-confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases, according to the Highland County Health Department.

In a previous Facebook post, Highland County Health Commissioner Jared Warner stated that probable cases must “[meet] clinical criteria AND epidemiologic evidence with no confirmatory laboratory testing performed for COVID-19” or “[meet] presumptive laboratory evidence AND either clinical criteria OR epidemiologic evidence.”

As of Friday, the health department had documented 19 probable cases in Highland County since the pandemic began.

The health department also reported that as of Friday there were currently 27 actively sick patients and three COVID-19-related hospitalizations, and the health department is currently monitoring 122 people for symptoms.

Since the COVID-19 outbreak reached Highland County, there have been a total of 27 COVID-19-related hospitalizations and four COVID-19-related deaths, and 238 patients have recovered from COVID-19.

According to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), which reported 227 cases in the county to date as of Friday, of the cases in Highland County:

* 42 cases involved 50- to 59-year-olds, four of whom were hospitalized.

* 38 cases involved 70- to 79-year-olds, eight of whom were hospitalized and one of whom later died.

* 38 cases involved 40- to 49-year-olds, three of whom were hospitalized.

* 37 cases involved 60- to 69-year-olds, five of whom were hospitalized and one of whom later died.

* 31 cases involved 20- to 29-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 27 cases involved 30- to 39-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* 22 cases involved 0- to 19-year-olds, one of whom was hospitalized.

* Six cases involved someone 80 years old or older, four of whom were hospitalized and two of whom later died.

* One case involved someone of an unknown age range.

According to ODH, Highland County’s long-term care facilities experienced an increase in COVID-19 cases as of Wednesday.

As of Wednesday, according to ODH:

* Crestwood Nursing Home — This week, Crestwood had six cases among residents and three cases among staff. Since April 15, Crestwood has had a total of six cumulative resident cases and four cumulative staff cases.

* Edgewood Manor — Edgewood did not have any reported COVID-19 cases this week. Since April 15, Edgewood has had a total of one cumulative resident case. Edgewood has not had any reported cases involving its staff members.

* Heartland of Hillsboro — Heartland did not have any reported COVID-19 cases this week. Since April 15, Heartland has had a total of two cumulative cases involving staff members. Heartland has not had any reported cases involving its residents.

* The Laurels of Hillsboro — The Laurels did not have any reported COVID-19 cases this week. Since April 15, the Laurels has had a total of two cumulative cases involving staff members. The Laurels has not had any reported cases involving its residents.

As of Thursday, Highland County remains at a level 1 public emergency, which represents active COVID-19 exposure and spread.

Nearby, Pike and Scioto counties remain level 3 emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, as of Thursday. ODH noted that both counties have high cases incidences.

ODH recommends that residents and those visiting level 3 counties limit activities as much as possible.

In mid-July, the ODH upgraded Highland County to a level 2 public emergency, which represents increased COVID-19 exposure and spread. The county remained a level 2 public emergency until Aug. 20, when it returned to a level 1 rating.

For more information about ODH’s public health advisory system, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/public-health-advisory-system/.

In news from the office of Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, according to a Thursday press release:

* ODH found that 11 counties currently have a very high risk of exposure and spread (Level 3): Ashland, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, Mercer, Montgomery, Muskingum, Pike, Putnam, Richland, and Scioto. Richland County is on the borderline of a Level 4 public emergency with severe exposure and spread.

“We have 11 red counties, which is more than we’ve seen at any point in September,” DeWine said. “Although many Ohioans are working hard to keep this virus in check, unfortunately, we are seeing a rebound in some areas of the state. This pandemic isn’t over, so please continue to stay home if you’re sick, wear a mask when you’re out, and keep at least six feet between you and those outside of your household.”

* DeWine announced that counties had been ranked based on COVID-19 data — including cases, hospitalizations and deaths — between Sept. 1 and Sept. 30.

Highland County ranked 73rd out of 88 counties during the month of September, which represents a lower number of cases in comparison with other counties in the state.

Counties are ranked by cases per 100,000 people, according to the press release.

According to this data, Highland County had 85.7 cases per capita during the month of September — or 37 new cases in a county with a population of 43,163.

Putnam County ranked the highest with 688.1 cases per capita, followed by Mercer, Athens, Shelby, Wood, Henry, Butler, Darke, Lawrence, and Auglaize counties.

Nearby, Pike County ranked 13th, Scioto County ranked 29th, Ross County ranked 32nd, Fayette County ranked 39th, Adams County ranked 42nd, Brown County ranked 52nd, and Clinton County ranked 58th.

Franklin County, where Columbus is located, ranked 14th.

For more information on COVID-19 in Ohio, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Reach McKenzie Caldwell at 937-402-2570.

This graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/10/web1_covidupdate-3.jpgThis graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences.
DeWine: Increase in ‘red’ counties

By McKenzie Caldwell

mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com