Warner: County hospitalization rate decreases


DeWine: Statewide curfew extended

By McKenzie Caldwell - mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com



This graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences. Counties marked with an asterisk (*) indicate counties on the level 4 watch list.

This graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences. Counties marked with an asterisk (*) indicate counties on the level 4 watch list.


Graphic courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health

Highland County Health Commissioner Jared Warner reported Wednesday that local COVID-19 vaccination planning meetings have resumed in anticipation of receiving vaccines in the coming weeks.

As of Wednesday, Warner said select CVS Pharmacies, Walgreens Pharmacies, and health departments will receive vaccine supplies directly. Warner reported that the Highland County Health Department has signed up to be a direct provider of the COVID-19 vaccine.

“There are a lot of questions still about the rollout, but we do know that vaccine will initially be targeted for those who provide care and interact closely with COVID-19 patients,” Warner said.

Warner also reported that, while the health department saw 27 to 31 new cases each day over the last week, Highland County’s hospitalization rate had decreased over the last seven days, as of Wednesday.

“I hope this trend continues,” Warner wrote in a Wednesday post to the health department’s Facebook page.

In Covid-related news from the state, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced Thursday that the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) will extend the statewide curfew to Jan. 2, 2021.

The curfew is 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.

“The curfew does not apply to those going to and from work, those who have an emergency, or those who need medical care,” a news release from DeWine’s office read. “The curfew is not intended to stop anyone from getting groceries or going to the pharmacy. Picking up carry-out or a drive-thru meal and ordering for delivery will be permitted, but serving food and drink within an establishment must cease at 10 p.m.”

No updates regarding Highland County’s Covid statistics were available from the health department as of press time Friday.

As of Thursday, Highland County remained a “red” county with high case incidence, according to the Ohio Public Health Advisory System (OPHAS).

“Red” counties, which OPHAS also classifies as level 3 public health emergencies, have “very high” COVID-19 exposure and spread.

In the past two weeks, Highland County has had 365 new cases, or 845.67 new cases per 100,000 residents, according to OPHAS.

Warner previously stated that the county must have under 100 new cases per 100,000 residents to decrease from a “red” rating.

Out of Ohio’s 88 counties, 78 counties were rated as “red” counties; five counties were rated as level 2 “orange” counties.

As of Thursday, five counties were rated “purple” level 4 public health emergencies, which designate severe exposure and spread.

Last week, eight counties were “purple.”

Residents in “purple” counties should only leave home for essential supplies and services, according to OPHAS.

No counties were rated as level 1 “yellow” counties, the lowest rate of exposure and spread.

According to the ODH, which reported 1,583 cumulative cases in the county as of Friday, of the cases in Highland County:

* 257 cases involved 50- to 59-year-olds. Of these cases, 11 resulted in hospitalization.

* 225 cases involved 60- to 69-year-olds. Of these cases, 15 resulted in hospitalization, and two resulted in death.

* 221 cases involved 40- to 49-year-olds. Of these cases, six resulted in hospitalization.

* 210 cases involved 30- to 39-year-olds. Of these cases, one resulted in hospitalization.

* 202 cases involved 20- to 29-year-olds. Of these cases, one resulted in hospitalization.

* 176 cases involved 70- to 79-year-olds. Of these cases, 24 resulted in hospitalization, and six resulted in death.

* 168 cases involved 0- to 19-year-olds. Of these cases, one resulted in hospitalization.

* 119 cases involved someone 80 years old or older. Of these cases, 17 resulted in hospitalization, and 10 resulted in death.

* Five cases involved patients of unknown ages.

Warner previously stated that there is a delay in the reporting process between individual counties and the ODH.

For more information on COVID-19 in Ohio, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Reach McKenzie Caldwell at 937-402-2570.

This graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences. Counties marked with an asterisk (*) indicate counties on the level 4 watch list.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/12/web1_covidupdate-dec11.jpgThis graphic shows the Ohio Department of Health’s public emergency rating of each Ohio county as of Thursday. The ODH has designated counties rated as level 1 public emergencies as yellow; counties ranked as level 2 public emergencies, which represent increased exposure and spread, are orange; and counties ranked as level 3 public emergencies, which represent very high exposure and spread, are red. Counties marked with an “H” have high case incidences. Counties marked with an asterisk (*) indicate counties on the level 4 watch list. Graphic courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health
DeWine: Statewide curfew extended

By McKenzie Caldwell

mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com