Mitchell Park summer programs remain uncertain


Greenfield names new council member, discusses infiltration issues

By Angela Shepherd - For The Times-Gazette



Greenfield Village Council members (l-r) pictured at Tuesday’s meeting are Kyle Barr, Eric Borsini, Phil Clyburn and Brenda Losey.

Greenfield Village Council members (l-r) pictured at Tuesday’s meeting are Kyle Barr, Eric Borsini, Phil Clyburn and Brenda Losey.


Photo by Angela Shepherd

The status of youth baseball and softball being played at Mitchell Park remains uncertain, city manager Todd Wilkin said at this week’s Greenfield Village Council meeting.

Wilkin said the village recreation committee met last month to discuss the upcoming season, and is scheduled to meet again on March 11.

Last year, the season was cancelled due to the village not being able to ensure a safe environment amid a pandemic for the gatherings that the season brings, as well as meet all the new requirements put in place due to COVID-19.

Wilkin said the administration has not been able to answer all the questions coming in about the 2021 season as staff has been very busy working on an opportunity for Greenfield that could mean the creation of well-paying jobs.

“We have not had the chance to respond or even think about the baseball and softball leagues,” he said. “I apologize for this, but feel our time is better spent on opportunities to grow our community.”

In a recent memo from Wilkin posted on the village’s Facebook page, he reiterated the administration’s request for the community to come together and “help re-establish a thriving and eventful summer youth baseball and softball program.”

The city manager echoed that sentiment Tuesday when he said the government should not be running the programs, but instead the committee and volunteers running the programs can help them be successful and, not only thrive, but even grow.

He said when decisions are made about the season, that information will be shared.

On a related recreation committee matter, council approved Donnie Ary to fill a vacant seat on the board.

Also during the meeting, Amie Ernst was selected to fill the village council seat vacated when Mark Branham resigned at the end of January due to health reasons.

According to council chair Phil Clyburn, two people applied for the spot and “both were excellent candidates.” He said that while in executive session council members discussed at length the merits of each candidate before voting on the matter.

In other business, reports from various village departments were presented to council, with the water department and wastewater treatment department reports highlighting the massive inflow and infiltration issues the village is trying to get rectified.

From the wastewater treatment plant, the report shows that more than 34 million gallons of water were treated. However, according to the water department report, just over 9 million gallons were pumped.

While there was excessive precipitation in February with the snow and the subsequent melt overlapping with rain at the end of the month, the numbers clearly show problems the administration is trying to fix.

Wilkin said fixing the issues with the aged infrastructure will be a yearslong process, but the village will be strategic in the projects targeted to profoundly mitigate the inflow and infiltration.

Council members have passed legislation recently allowing the city manager to apply for grant funding for infrastructure projects.

Legislation passed Tuesday opens another avenue for the village to recoup costs on blighted properties that it spends to make those properties safe, whether by simple measures or by demolition.

Wilkin said typically the costs would go through the county auditor as a special assessment, funds the village is unlikely to ever get back. The new legislation allows for costs to be certified to the village’s finance director, which would allow the village to move forward with foreclosure.

The legislation is part of the village’s ongoing efforts to remove blight from the community. There are several properties currently in the process, and several more that the village intends to take action on.

Other legislation passed at the meeting included an ordinance allowing village employees a 3 percent raise, which will be dependent on a merit-based evaluation by their respective department heads, and something that will be reviewed and approved by the city manager.

“Without the employees, Greenfield wouldn’t be what it is,” Wilkin said.

Borsini reported that there will be a finance committee meeting on Friday at 10 a.m. in the council chambers on the third floor of the City Building. The meeting is open to the public.

Gratitude was offered during the meeting to Grow Greater Greenfield for its successful Brews and Stews event held over the weekend.

Angela Shepherd is a correspondent for the village of Greenfield.

Greenfield Village Council members (l-r) pictured at Tuesday’s meeting are Kyle Barr, Eric Borsini, Phil Clyburn and Brenda Losey.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2021/03/web1_council.jpgGreenfield Village Council members (l-r) pictured at Tuesday’s meeting are Kyle Barr, Eric Borsini, Phil Clyburn and Brenda Losey. Photo by Angela Shepherd
Greenfield names new council member, discusses infiltration issues

By Angela Shepherd

For The Times-Gazette

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