4-H enrollment deadline is April 1


By Danielle Combs - For The Times-Gazette



It’s that time of year when we spring forward and why not into 4-H? The deadline to enroll youth into 4-H is rapidly approaching on Thursday, April 1.

4-H offers many opportunities for youth to learn about a wide variety of topics, develop public speaking and interviewing skills, as well as establish lifelong friendships.

Cloverbud participation begins when a child is in kindergarten and is 5 years old (as of Jan. 1). Participation in 4-H projects and competitive events begins when a child is in third grade and is 8 years old or 9 years old regardless of grade level (as of Jan. 1). Members can choose from more than 200 projects from animals to bicycles, clothing, fishing, food, gardening, genealogy, health, leadership, photography, robotics, shopping, shooting sports, STEM, tractors and even welding. The possibilities are endless.

4-H youth showcase their projects in their communities, counties and maybe even at the Ohio State Fair. Members have opportunities to attend camps at the county and state levels, attend trips across Ohio, the U.S. and internationally, along with applying for awards for all the hard work they put toward their involvement. 4-H’s emblem of a four-leaf clover with the four white H’s embodies the health, heart, hands and health in which the program strives to achieve with its members.

In 4-H, youth have lots of opportunities to explore the things that excite them — the things that help them find their spark. From projects to camp, to community service and club meetings, 4-Hers make the best better every day.

To learn more, contact Kathy Bruynis or Danielle Combs at the Highland County office of Ohio State University Extension. You can reach Bruynis and Combs at 937-393-1918 or by email at Bruynis.5@osu.edu or combs.311@osu.edu. You can also learn more about Highland County 4-H through the county website of highland.osu.edu.

Danielle Combs is a 4-H youth development educator with OSU Extension, Highland County.

By Danielle Combs

For The Times-Gazette