GHS Sunday Dinner is March 4


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Greenfield Historical Society volunteer Paul Wisecup explains the history and use of the Browder Lifesaving Net to second-graders during their annual spring visit to the society’s museums.

Greenfield Historical Society volunteer Paul Wisecup explains the history and use of the Browder Lifesaving Net to second-graders during their annual spring visit to the society’s museums.


The Greenfield Historical Society will hold its last Sunday Dinner of the year Sunday, March 4 at the Grain & Hay building and the menu will be ham loaf, cheesy potatoes, choice of vegetable, pineapple upside down cake, bread and drinks.

Waiters and waitresses will serve guests from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. with real plates and silverware. The cost is $10 and no tipping is requested.

In addition to helping pay utility bills, maintenance of the society’s buildings and various preservation activities of the society, proceeds also help fund education programs for Greenfield’s school children.

In the spring the fourth-graders are given a program on the inventors and manufacturers of Greenfield, while the third-graders attend a program about what schools were like many years ago. The fourth- and third-graders also visit the Konneker Education Museum.

The fifth-graders are treated every October to a program about John Parker and the Underground Railroad. This program is provided with the assistance of the Buckskin and Rainsboro PTOs.

During the second-graders visit in May, they learn about transportation in Greenfield over the years. Members of the Greenfield Police Department, Paint Creek Joint EMS/Fire District and Dragin Angels Car Club share their vehicles while society volunteers share stories about the society’s Conestoga wagon, buggies and train exhibit.

“Come on down after church and have a great meal, visit with friends and support the Greenfield Historical Society,” the society said in a news release.

Submitted by Harold Schmidt, Greenfield Historical Society.

Greenfield Historical Society volunteer Paul Wisecup explains the history and use of the Browder Lifesaving Net to second-graders during their annual spring visit to the society’s museums.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/02/web1_Sunday-diner-pic.jpgGreenfield Historical Society volunteer Paul Wisecup explains the history and use of the Browder Lifesaving Net to second-graders during their annual spring visit to the society’s museums.

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