Greenfield sees progress on blighted properties


Wilkin gives grant update; Greenfield Research recognized

By Angela Shepherd - For The Times-Gazette



Greenfield Village Councilman Chris Borreson presents a proclamation to Mike Penn of Greenfield Research, naming Nov. 2, 2018 “Greenfield Research Inc. Day” in honor of the company, which is celebrating its 50th year.

Greenfield Village Councilman Chris Borreson presents a proclamation to Mike Penn of Greenfield Research, naming Nov. 2, 2018 “Greenfield Research Inc. Day” in honor of the company, which is celebrating its 50th year.


Angela Shepherd | For The Times-Gazette

The Village of Greenfield administration has been working on addressing blighted properties in recent months, and is now beginning to see the fruits of those endeavors.

According to Law Director Brian Zets, complaints have been filed against six nuisance properties in town, and since then, there has been action on two of them. He said the owners contacted the village shortly after they were served with legal documents.

City Manager Todd Wilkin reported that one of the property owners is proceeding with demolition, and another is renovating their property.

At a previous council meeting in July, Wilkin said he hoped to send a message to homeowners not in compliance with village ordinances or cleanup requests that the administration is serious about cleaning up Greenfield. On Tuesday, he said he thinks people are starting to get that message.

While the six homes targeted this time are a small percentage of blight in Greenfield, it is forward motion, Wilkin said, and the administration plans to continue its efforts.

In other matters, Wilkin updated council on pending grants. One is for storm sewer, sanitary sewer, curb and sidewalk replacement on Mill Street and North Washington Street. The project was evaluated earlier this month and ranked a top priority in Highland County, getting 227 out of 250 points, Wilkin said. From this point, the project moves on to the Ohio Valley Regional Development Commission for ranking among other projects before possibly moving on to the state level for grant funding consideration.

On a related matter, he said North Fifth Street between Mill and Evans streets are currently being evaluated for a possible critical infrastructure grant that could provide a solution to flooding that is damaging property in the area.

In other business, Mike Penn of Greenfield Research was recognized with a proclamation honoring the company, which celebrates its golden anniversary this year.

Councilman Chris Borreson read the proclamation as he presented it to Penn, touching on the company’s history and its growth through the last 50 years.

Now, the company occupies three buildings throughout the village, adding up to approximately 255,000 square feet of production and warehouse space, Borreson read.

He also spoke of the company’s continuous service to the community.

In Wilkin’s report, the city manager congratulated Penn and Greenfield Research for the company’s longevity, for providing “careers for countless families” through the years, and for being a “great partner” to the village and the community.

The proclamation names Nov. 2, 2018 as Greenfield Research Inc. Day.

The city manager also said he met with a number of local officials to discuss workforce shortage, something that many business owners have claimed to be a problem.

“Tonight, I don’t have the answers,” he said. But he added that he wants business owners to know that discussion is taking place and officials are seeking ways to remedy the problem.

Wilkin reported that a yard waste site at the wastewater treatment plant will once again be open to residents from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 26 and from 8 a.m. to noon Oct. 27. The wastewater treatment plant is located at 187 Lost Bridge Rd.

Borreson read a letter stating that The Slice pizza restaurant on Jefferson Street is seeking a license from the state to sell beer. If any resident has objections to this, those objections can be voiced at the next council meeting on Nov. 6, Borreson said.

Councilmen Bob Bergstrom and Phil Clyburn were excused from Tuesday’s meeting.

Greenfield Village Council meets in regular session the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. in council chambers on the first floor of the City Building. The meetings are open to the public.

Angela Shepherd is a stringer for The Times-Gazette.

Greenfield Village Councilman Chris Borreson presents a proclamation to Mike Penn of Greenfield Research, naming Nov. 2, 2018 “Greenfield Research Inc. Day” in honor of the company, which is celebrating its 50th year.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/10/web1_f-gf-council-10-16-18.jpgGreenfield Village Councilman Chris Borreson presents a proclamation to Mike Penn of Greenfield Research, naming Nov. 2, 2018 “Greenfield Research Inc. Day” in honor of the company, which is celebrating its 50th year. Angela Shepherd | For The Times-Gazette
Wilkin gives grant update; Greenfield Research recognized

By Angela Shepherd

For The Times-Gazette