Curfew, mass gathering orders detailed


Exceptions for 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew

By McKenzie Caldwell - mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com



This graphic maps out the number of new COVID-19 cases each day in Highland County from March 1 to Nov. 21. The data is based on the date patients began to experience COVID-19 symptoms.

This graphic maps out the number of new COVID-19 cases each day in Highland County from March 1 to Nov. 21. The data is based on the date patients began to experience COVID-19 symptoms.


Graphic courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) released two health orders this month, which have since gone into effect: the “stay at home tonight” order, which includes a curfew, and a revised order that limits mass gatherings.

The “stay at home tonight” order, which went into effect on Nov. 19, orders Ohioans to stay at home between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. with the following exceptions:

* Those leaving their residences for reasons connected to the health and safety of family, members of households, pets, or those who cannot or should not leave their homes.

* Those leaving their residences to obtain necessary supplies or services, including food items.

* Those leaving their residences to access necessary social services.

* Those leaving their residences for work, including volunteer work.

* Those leaving their residences to care for or transport others, including pets.

Under this order, Ohioans can still purchase food and beverages through in-house delivery, third-party delivery, drive-thrus, curbside pick-up, and carry-out.

The order does not apply to religious observances or First Amendment protected speech.

As of press time, the “stay at home tonight” order will remain in effect for 21 days, or until Thursday, Dec. 10.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine previously stated on Twitter that those who are on the roads between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. will not be penalized, but gatherings are not permitted.

The revised order on mass gatherings prohibits all public and private gatherings of more than 10 people — excluding weddings, funerals, religious observances, and First Amendment protected speech — in accordance with President Trump’s March 16 Covid guidelines.

Under the revised order, weddings, funerals, and other events located at banquet facilities are subject to the following restrictions:

* No socializing or other activities in open congregate areas, including dancing.

* Guests must remain seated at all times and wear masks unless actively consuming food and beverages.

* No more than 10 people may be seated at a table, and those individuals must be from the same household.

* No self-serve buffets or bar areas.

The order does permit activities such as first dance, toasts, and cutting of the cake at traditional wedding receptions.

The order permits pool tables, pinball machines, dartboards, jukeboxes, video games, arcade games, and other coin-operated machines to remain open.

The revised order went into effect on Nov. 17 and will remain in effect until “the State of Emergency declared in the Governor’s Executive Orders expires, or the Director of the Ohio Department of Health rescinds or modifies this Order.”

Find both the “stay at home tonight” order and the revised order on mass gatherings at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

In local COVID-19-related news, the Highland County Health Department will be closed to the public from Monday, Nov. 23 to Friday, Nov. 27. Those who have appointments should call the health department at 937-393-1941 when they arrive at the office.

As of Monday, a note on the ODH’s website read, “Today’s data is incomplete. Thousands of reports are pending review. Additionally, today’s data includes two days of positive test results that were delayed because of technical issues related to lab reporting. Please bear with us as we work through the surge in testing.”

According to the ODH, which reported 995 cumulative cases in the county as of Monday, of the cases in Highland County:

* 155 cases involved 50- to 59-year-olds. Of these cases, 10 resulted in hospitalization.

* 153 cases involved 60- to 69-year-olds. Of these cases, 10 resulted in hospitalization, and two resulted in death.

* 136 cases involved 40- to 49-year-olds. Of these cases, six resulted in hospitalization.

* 127 cases involved 20- to 29-year-olds. Of these cases, one resulted in hospitalization.

* 126 cases involved 70- to 79-year-olds. Of these cases, 19 resulted in hospitalization, and five resulted in death.

* 115 cases involved 0- to 19-year-olds. Of these cases, one resulted in hospitalization.

* 104 cases involved 30- to 39-year-olds. Of these cases, one resulted in hospitalization.

* 77 cases involved someone 80 years old or older. Of these cases, 13 resulted in hospitalization, and 10 resulted in death.

* Two cases involved patients of unknown ages.

Warner previously stated that there is a delay in the reporting process between individual counties and the ODH.

Reach McKenzie Caldwell at 937-402-2570.

This graphic maps out the number of new COVID-19 cases each day in Highland County from March 1 to Nov. 21. The data is based on the date patients began to experience COVID-19 symptoms.
https://www.timesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2020/11/web1_COVIDSummaryData_Cases-nov23.jpegThis graphic maps out the number of new COVID-19 cases each day in Highland County from March 1 to Nov. 21. The data is based on the date patients began to experience COVID-19 symptoms. Graphic courtesy of the Ohio Department of Health
Exceptions for 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew

By McKenzie Caldwell

mcaldwell@aimmediamidwest.com